Back-to-School Financial Checklist

8.16.17

Any parent knows that back-to-school time equals shopping, which can quickly add up. How is it that your kids always seem to require brand-new everything each year?

According to Deloitte, parents spend $488 for clothing, accessories, school supplies, computers and other electronics for their children1. This year, face back-to-school shopping with a plan. Coming up with a strategy that meets both your children’s needs as well as your financial responsibilities will help you minimize your costs. Continue reading

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Family Finances: Juggling Financial Obligations

6.14.17

Guest Blogger: Andrew Horowitz, CFP, Horowitz & Company, Inc.

As a parent or soon to be parent, there are many challenges that we face in life such as how to raise the child, getting them proper education, overcoming your child’s sickness, divvying up parental responsibilities, sleepless nights, as well as balancing work and parenting.  Continue reading

Feel Good About Your Financial Wellness

5.10.17

Guest Blogger: Andrew Horowitz, CFP, Horowitz & Company, Inc.

May is Mental Health Month, and the truth is that feeling good about your financial position can help to balance other areas of your life. Too many of us stress about money, and that stress has negative health effects. Financial wellness is something that everyone can work on regularly in order to keep in fiscal shape.

Continue reading

Financial Literacy Month: Emergency Funds

4.12.17 (003)

Guest Blogger: Andrew Horowitz, CFP, Horowitz & Company, Inc.

In honor of Financial Literacy Month, we are going to chat & chew about an important financial topic: emergency funds.

The concept of an emergency fund is one of the bedrocks of a solid financial plan. Hopefully it will never need to be tapped, but in order to ensure that any unplanned expenses are covered, it is often advised to keep a cash fund equal to approximately 3-6 months of income. Continue reading

MFS Monthly Tip: Generation X’s Retirement Status

3.8.17

Guest Blogger: Andrew Horowitz, CFP, Horowitz & Company, Inc.

How would you guess Gen X is faring when it comes to retirement saving? Americans born between 1965 and 1980 are approaching what should be their peak income years, and many of them have actively contributed to workplace retirement plans, IRAs, and investment accounts. At the same time, Gen X is becoming the new “sandwich generation”—spending time and money to care for kids and aging parents at once. Continue reading